Postcards from the Bleeding Edge
Saturday, May 24, 2008

  Colorizing the big bright green state machine

I've been busily optimizing OSLEC for the blackfin, X86, and X86_64 architectures.

It took a long period of thinking about how the algorithm really worked and how it interacted with the x86 hardware to figure out how to speed x86 up (My subconcious has labored on it since I hung out with David Rowe in February, watching an IP08 kind of fall over under the workload). I'm still not entirely sure how OSLEC works, actually, the inner mystery slips in and out of my head... David has been living inside it for far longer than I have and I keep referring back to his emails)

But: I had multiple eureka moments on the most mips eating loop on sunday night... I spent 2 days coding and testing... and (yea!)

I think I have achieved a major speedup for oslec on x86 and even more major on x86_64. I'm not going to say how much better it is until I finish checking to make sure it's bit exact with the original. (It's a lot faster. A virtual beer to the person that comes up with the closest guess. )

Flush with that success, creatively inspired, and wanting to defer writing a mind sucking tedious series of bitwalking tests for bit exactness for as long as possible, I took on the Blackfin.

I've spent about a month over the past quarter devouring manuals on the blackfin architecture and assembly language. It took reading some of them two or three times to really "get it". It is a cool processor!

So, for oslec, I came up with a parallel algorithm that I figured would be easily twice as fast as the original. (and with a little work, maybe more)

I had my eureka moment on wednesday I spent a day writing the code. 2 days cutting it down from 9 instructions to 7 in the inner loop. 3 days trying to get it to run. (you'll note how the math works out here, is that I didn't sleep very much)

It ran for the first time today. It's twice as fast as the original.

I think I have a major win there, but it is definitely NOT bit exact. !@#!@!!.

It's a rather big state machine to look at...

Worse.... I've got another major state machine that I'm debugging (alphatrack driver). I gave up on THAT last week, because it was just too tedious..... when programming stops being fun is when I start wanting a paycheck....

anyway, my whole life I have tended to look at enormous pictures of state that kind of look like this:


N0: 11000011111111000000000000000000
N1: 10000000000000000000000000000000
N2: 10000000000000000000100000000000
N3: 10000000000000000000100000000001
N4: 10000000000000000000100000000011
...


And I would let my eye pick out when it had gone wrong. Sometimes, when two parallel operations are going on, or I'm comparing a working piece of code with an optimized replacement, it makes sense to have BEFORE and AFTER on the same line:


BEFORE: 11000011111111000000000000000000 AFTER : 10000000000000000000000000000000
BEFORE: 11000011111111000000000000000000 AFTER : 10000000000000000000000000000000
BEFORE: 11000011111111000000000000000000 AFTER : 10000000000000000000000000000000
BEFORE: 11000011111111000000000000000000 AFTER : 10000000000000000000000000001000


Eyes are really good at seeing pictures in patterns like this, but when a state machine gets too big to fit on the screen, the patterns get harder to find. I would use smaller and smaller fonts until I could see as much as possible (sometimes hundreds of state changes on a screen - you don't have to actually be able to read the ones and zeros, font sizes of 2 are ok!)

You can take this to a real extreme if you have graphics available, and I've always kind of wanted to be able to zoom out of my session far enough to reduce each bit to a pixel...

It never occurred to me before now to use color for the *differences* between two machines.

It may be because I used to do this stuff on a huge monochrome Xterminal and it was simply easier to print out huge amounts of data and let my eyes due the work. I still miss that old Xterminal... and for that matter, green screens. So do my eyes.

My terminal windows are all green. The whole web has gone bright white and I find it, well, unsettling. Green is calming. it lets me think....

Anyway, I was looking for changes in new code vs old code in a 40 + 32 + 32 bit state machine and I decided that this was a better way to look at the differences:

10000000000000000000000000000000000000001000000000000000000000000000000011000011111111000000000000000000
10000000000000000000000000000000000000001100000000000000000000000000000001100100100100000000000000000000
00001011111000000000000000000000000000001000000000000000000000000000000010010110101100000000000000000000
10000000000000000000000000000000000000001000000000000000000000000000000011000011111111000000000000000000

And wrote an itty bitty little C program (that compiled the first time!) to generate both HTML and ansi character sequences. I like my cool green, and prefer cool colors, so on the green terminal this actually generates blue colors....

C++ has a nicer way of dealing with values larger than 64 bits (bitsets - LOVE EM), but this was good enough for my purposes....

I could turn this into a library but I gotta state machine to debug. Now that I've blogged I've run out of reasons to put it off... I sure hope a swell comes in soon....


/* Diffbits - released into the public domain 2008 by Michael Taht */

#include

// Some ansi standard strings

#ifdef HTML
#define REDON ""
#define REDOFF ""
#else
#define REDON "\033[01;34m"
#define REDOFF "\033[00m"
#endif

static int diffbits_64(long a,long b,int size) {
int color = 0;
int abit = 0;
int bbit = 0;
int status = 0;
int i;
for(i = 0; i < size; i++) {
abit = (a&1);
bbit = (b&1);
if(abit != bbit) {
status = 1;
if(color !=1) {
printf(REDON);
color = 1;
}
} else {
if(color ==1) {
printf(REDOFF);
color = 0;
}
}
printf("%d",abit);
a = a >> 1;
b = b >> 1;
}
if(color ==1) {
printf(REDOFF);
color = 0;
}
return (status);
}

int diffbits64(int a, int b) {
return diffbits_64(a,b,sizeof(long long)*8);
}

int diffbits32(int a, int b) {
return diffbits_64(a,b,sizeof(int)*8);
}

int diffbits16(int a, int b) {
return diffbits_64(a,b,sizeof(short)*8);
}

int diffbits8(char a, char b) {
return diffbits_64(a,b,sizeof(char)*8);
}

diffbits(long a, long b) {
diffbits_64(a,b,sizeof(int)*8);
}

#ifdef TEST

int main () {
diffbits(1,0); printf("\n");
diffbits(-1,1); printf("\n");
diffbits(555,225); printf("\n");
diffbits(16323,-12225); printf("\n");

diffbits8(1,-1); printf("\n");
diffbits16(1,-1); printf("\n");
diffbits16(16323,-12225); printf("\n");
diffbits32(1,-1); printf("\n");
diffbits32(1,2); printf("\n");
diffbits32(16323,-12225); printf("\n");
diffbits64(1,-1); printf("\n");
diffbits64(1,2); printf("\n");
diffbits64(16323,-12225); printf("\n");
}

Labels: , ,

 
Sunday, May 18, 2008

  Transport strike over, working too hard

The nationwide transport strike in Nicaragua is over.

I was a bit worried when it started - the US state department issued an advisory that US citizens stock up on a week's worth of food, there were reports of violence, and food shortages but...

The strike didn't have all that much effect on San Juan Del Sur, otherwise known as "gringolandia". The food shelves never emptied, and although the streets were quiet and devoid of smoking busses and drivers yelling "RivasRivasRivas" all of last week, it was more likely that if you looked like you needed a lift, someone would pull you into an alleyway and say:

"Psst. Wanna ride?".

People adapted. They hitchhiked (even more than usual), dragged old bikes out of garages, walked, or stayed on their front porches and visited with each other.

Today the taxi drivers seem more subdued than usual. They should be happy, they got their prices reduced for gasoline reduced to a little over $3 dollars a gallon (and to pay for it, non-public transport got their costs raised to $5.30 a gallon). A long term plus is the government promised to import & finance 3,000 kits to transform taxis from gasoline to LP-gas (propane).

Now I've got a week's worth of canned food to get through. Yum.

In solidarity the local "transport you to surf" business also shut down, and I got in a bad habit of working from sunup (which for me seemed to be from 10:30 or so) nearly to sunup (4-5 AM) - with a major nap from 3-6PM. Working, especially late at night, has always been a very productive thing for me, but the lack of sunlight and conciousness at crucial parts of the day really cut down on the fun I could have had. Waves were good (but it took effort to line up transport, so I didn't go), sun was good (but I was working), people were having a good time (but I was working), and my closest friend down here was closeted with his gf (and I was working). My distractions were minimal. I barely noticed the time flying by. Sometimes I'd be hungry for hours before I would get up to do anything about it.

I got a ton of work done, a brainful of code dumped, working, and outlined. It's all broken up in small enough pieces now that I hopefully won't have to do a 90 hr workweek for a while. The cooltop guys are onto something, though.

I got a major module to proof of concept on friday morning, more on that in a minute. For "relaxation", I spent the next 24 hours hacking on a major problem in the jack audio connection kit involving some hairy problems with threading and a runaway process. I'm on about my 7th crazy theory, but I think the one I'm on now has some legs.

I finally took a break on Saturday afternoon, whipped out my guitar, and started playing in front of my office. More than a few people stopped by to listen, and a few people that I only knew in passing borrowed my guitar and revealed themselves to be good players. I already knew my neighbor Pablo could play, but didn't know Marvin (who works for adelante in the back), did. He played and sang some great classic spanish songs and then surprised me with a pretty good rendition of "sounds of silence" - neither of us knew the words.

It was a beautiful day, I cheered up enormously by sundown. I need to play outside more often, & maybe put out a begging bowl!

Then I went back to work. All last week I'd been:

Digging into the internals of Ardour. I plan to rip out the existing tranzport and alphatrack drivers and replace them with stuff that uses the OSC protocol as an intermediary. However, to do it, I wanted to push OSC harder than I had ever heard anyone push it before. I wanted to send out packets as big as the udp protocol would allow, with a complete snapshot of audio position, gain, and volume, for every track, every 10 ms. I wanted to multicast the data across the network, so a profusion of potential controllers would be able to respond to and control ardour remotely. (think big mixing desks, or little things like the tranzport and alphatrack, and anything in between)

The broadcast protocol is designed to be able to compensate for lost data (by sending all the data, all the time, at fixed intervals, which is kind of like how voip works), by sending EVERYTHING. Brute force has its uses, this is one of them.

It's a crazy idea, though. Really. 100 64KB packets per second is 6.4 megabytes - per second - over half of a 100Mbit per second network. It will only work at all on a switched 100MB lan or a direct wire to the box. But: 100 64KB packets per second is only 5% of a GigE network! GigE cards are in most computers now, and GigE switches are less than a 100 bucks. So, while this idea was utterly insane 4 years ago, it is actually quite doable with modern technology.

At least in this case I'm using multicast (courtesy of liblo from svn), so, even if I have dozens of devices attached to ardour - software controllers on other machines, etc - network usage is flat, only a function of the number of the tracks, not the number of controllers, and the logic inside of ardour is dirt simple stupid, pushing the required intelligence out to the controllers, which have to sort it all out. (and I mean *all* - even the stuff they aren't interested in).

So I got that working Thursday night, with a few faked up bits where I couldn't figure out the depths of the class hierarchy well enough to get the data I needed, but enough to get a proof of concept running.

Result: On my main box, Ardour doesn't even notice that it is pumping out this much data. the cpu barely registers the activity. The wired lan shrugs it off, too. but my wireless network becomes unusable - not even dhcp packets can get through while the OSC multicast is running.

Wireless is significantly slower than 100Mbit ethernet, and worse, most wireless routers are configured as bridges, not routers, so even though you may have no listeners for a given packet on the wireless lan, mine just saturates anyway. If this router ran openwrt I'd be able to make it route (or block) OSC multicast, but it doesn't so I'm not sure what to do about it yet. I'm a little concerned about what I'm doing to my upstream provider...

I coded up a little client in python - and IT killed the system - because it wrote so much data to the screen that Xwindows ate 80% of cpu. (formatted, I imagine it was over 100MB/sec) I turn off the screen writes, and it's fine, so the client side can work, too.

It is rather nice to be able to do protocol design iteratively and not to have to worry about the layout of the fields, etc. OSC makes that part easy.

I have high hopes that over the next couple weeks I'll finally get the tranzport and alphatrack doing what I want them to do. At the same time, this past week really exhausted me, I have had no brain cells since saturday.

When not heads down into ardour I was working on turning this little algorithm into verilog:

for (i = taps ; i >= offset1; i--)
{
exp = (ec->fir_state_bg.history[i - offset1]*factor);
ec->fir_taps16[1][i] += (int16_t) ((exp+(1<<14)) >> 15);
}
for ( ; i >= 0; i--)
{
exp = (ec->fir_state_bg.history[i + offset2]*factor);
ec->fir_taps16[1][i] += (int16_t) ((exp+(1<<14)) >> 15);
}



Anyway, its Sunday night. And I'm going to go have some fun. Monday I start working on extracting the alphatrack driver from deep within ardour's guts, and the send protocol.

Labels: ,

 
David Täht writes about politics, space, copyright, the internet, audio software, operating systems and surfing.


Resume,Songs,
My new blog, NeX-6, My facebook page
Orgs I like
The EFF - keeping free speech in the world
Musical stuff I like
Jeff, Rick, Ardour, Jack
Prior Rants - Wireless and Wifi in 2015 - not what I dreamed of Saving wifi! Fixing Bufferbloat! Fighting the vend... Virgin Media - Fixing the epidemic of bufferbloat ... 49... and trying to find my navel Wheels down on mars! Tracking the landing of Curiosity, from Seattle spotting NEOs from around venus's orbit Asteroids as lunar orbit resources SOPA is bad news Departing France for England, then 'home'.
Best of the blog:
Uncle Bill's Helicopter - A speech I gave to ITT Tech - Chicken soup for engineers
Beating the Brand - A pathological exploration of how branding makes it hard to think straight
Inside the Internet Mind - trying to map the weather within the global supercomputer that consists of humans and google
Sex In Politics - If politicians spent more time pounding the flesh rather than pressing it, it would be a better world
Getting resources from space - An alternative to blowing money on mars using NEAs.
On the Columbia - Why I care about space
Authors I like:
Doc Searls
Where's Cherie?
UrbanAgora
Jerry Pournelle
The Cubic Dog
Evan Hunt
The Bay Area is talking
Brizzled
Zimnoiac Emanations
Eric Raymond
Unlocking The Air
Bob Mage
BroadBand & Me
SpaceCraft
Selenian Boondocks
My Pencil
Transterrestial Musings
Bear Waller Hollar
Callahans
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If you really want to, you can poke through the below links as well.

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